The UN and the Eighth Amendment

This letter is cross-posted from today’s Irish Times.

Sir, – The UN Human Rights Committee has found that Amanda Mellet’s right to be free from cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment, her right to privacy, and her right to equality before the law were violated because Irish law did not allow her to access abortion in Ireland in a case of fatal foetal abnormality.

It has held that Ireland must amend its abortion law, including the Constitution if necessary, to ensure compliance with the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR), including ensuring effective, timely and accessible procedures for pregnancy termination in cases of fatal foetal abnormality in Ireland.

The Taoiseach and others have noted that the findings of this committee are not “binding”.

Here are six legal and policy reasons why Ireland must take good faith steps to implement the findings and comply with its international obligations:

1) In 1989, Ireland voluntarily ratified the ICCPR. Under international law, it must now comply with the treaty in good faith. It cannot invoke its Constitution, or any other domestic law as rationale for failure to comply (Articles 26 and 27 of the Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties).

2. Although the UN Human Rights Committee does not have the status of an international court, Ireland has accepted its competence to hear individual complaints and to give authoritative interpretations of the ICCPR. Its members are impartial and independent. Ireland recognised the committee’s competence to issue determinative interpretations of the convention when it ratified the ICCPR and its optional protocol.

3) When Ireland subjected Ms Mellet to cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment, it committed an internationally wrongful act. International law, including the ICCPR, requires it to remedy this wrongful act, provide reparations and guarantee non-repetition. Ireland cannot invoke provisions of its domestic law as rationale for a failure to do so (Article 2 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights; Articles 1, 3, 30-32 of the Principles on Responsibility of States for Internationally Wrongful Acts).

4. It is immaterial to Ireland’s responsibility under international law that the relevant treaties have not been incorporated into domestic law or that as such the decisions of the committee are not necessarily enforceable in Irish courts. Under international law a lack of enforcement options under domestic law, or the fact that under domestic law the committee’s decision is not binding, can never be used as justification for non-compliance.

5) If Ireland does not remedy the harm suffered by Ms Mellet and guarantee non-repetition it will place Irish medical professionals in profoundly difficult ethical situations and place them at risk of complicity in cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment.

6) If Ireland does not remedy the harm suffered and guarantee non-repetition it will leave itself open to repeated future litigation against the State before the UN committee or other international bodies, including the European Court of Human Rights.Until the legal framework is brought into line with Ireland’s international legal obligations, the likelihood is that women will continue to engage with international legal institutions to seek recognition of rights violations, remedy, and guarantees of non-repetition.

– Yours, etc,

Prof. Fiona de Londras, University of Birmingham Law School
Mairead Enright, Lecturer in Law, University of Kent
Prof. Christine Bell, University of Edinburgh Law School
Prof. Fionnuala ni Aolain, University of Ulster Transitional Justice Institute
Prof. Siobhan Wills, University of Ulster Transitional Justice Institute
Prof. Aoife Nolan, University of Nottingham Law School
Prof. Laurence O. Gostin, Georgetown Law School
Prof. Oscar Cabrera, Georgetown Law School
Lilian Abriniskas, Women and Health in Uruguay
Mónica Roa, Colombian Attorney, Global Advocate, Expert on Reproductive Rights.
Sharon Pia Hickey, Teaching Fellow, Global Gender Justice Clinic, Cornell law School
Ailbhe Smyth, Coalition to Repeal the 8th
Niamh Allen, Head of Membership and Development, National Women’s Council of Ireland
Helen Guinane, Parents for Choice
Senator Ivana Bacik
Professor Tamara Hervey, School of Law, Sheffield University
Dr. Rosa Freedman, Senior Lecturer in Law, University of Birmingham
Dr. Aoife O’Donoghue, Senior Lecturer in Law, Durham University
Dr. Paul O’Connell, Reader in Law, SOAS London
Dr. Rose Parfitt, Lecturer in Law, University of Kent
Dr. Eilionoir Flynn, Senior Lecturer in Law, NUI Galway
Rumyana Grozdanova, Lecturer in Law, University of Liverpool
Dr. Anne-Marie Brennan, Lecturer in Law, University of Liverpool
Dr. Illan rua Wall, Associate Professor in Law, Warwick University
Dr. John Reynolds, Lecturer in Law, NUI Maynooth
Dr. Bríd Ní Ghráinne, Lecturer in Law, University of Sheffield
Dr. Sorcha McLeod, Lecturer in Law, University of Sheffield
Dr. Michelle Farrell, Senior Lecturer in Law, University of Liverpool
Maeve O’Rourke, Barrister
Dr. Natasa Mavronicola, Lecturer in Law, Queen’s University Belfast
Ntina Tzouvala, Lecturer in Law, Durham University
Dr. Liam Thornton, Lecturer in Law, UCD
Dr. Stefanie Khoury, Postdoctoral Research Associate, University of Liverpool
Dr. Kathryn McNeilly, Lecturer in Law, Queen’s University Belfast
Dr. Catherine O’Rourke, Senior Lecturer, Transitional Justice Institute, University of Ulster
Dr. Alex Schwartz, Lecturer, Queen’s University Belfast
Dr. Sheelagh McGuinness, Senior Lecturer in Law, Bristol University
Dr. Vicky Conway, Lecturer in Law, Dublin City University
Prof. David Whyte, University of Liverpool
Dr. Ruth Fletcher, Senior Lecturer in Law, Queen Mary University of London
Jennifer Schweppe, Lecturer in Law, University of Limerick
Professor Rosemary Hunter, Queen Mary University of London
Dr. Amel Alghrani, Lecturer in Law, University of Liverpool
Dr. Anne Neylon, Lecturer in Law, University of Liverpool
Dr. Katherine O’Donnell, Associate Professor in Philosophy, UCD
Colin Murray, Senior Lecturer in Law, Newcastle University
Dr. Sinead Ring, Lecturer in Law, University of Kent
Dr. Elizabeth Campbell, Senior Lecturer in Law, University of Edinburgh
Dr. Fergus Ryan, Lecturer in Law, NUI Maynooth
Dr. Louise Crowley, Senior Lecturer in Law, UCC
Dr. Catherine O’Sullivan, Senior Lecturer in Law, UCC
Dr. Sara Ramshaw, Senior Lecturer in Law, Exeter University
Dr. Alan Greene, Lecturer in Law, Durham Law School
Jane Rooney, PhD Candidate in Law, Durham University
Eilish Rooney, Senior Lecturer, Transitional Justice Institute, University of Ulster
Muireann Meehan Speed, PhD Candidate, Oxford University
Dr. Sorcha Ui Chonnachtaigh, Lecturer in Ethics, Keele University
Dr. Edel Quirke, PhD in Law
Eileen Crowley, White & Case LLP
Wendy Lyon, Solicitor
Orla Ryan, Barrister
Kate Butler, Barrister
Dr. Joan McCarthy, Lecturer in Healthcare Ethics, UCC
Goretti Horgan, Lecturer in Social Policy, University of Ulster
Suzanne Guilloud, Barrister
Claire Nevin, Human Rights and Social Affairs Adviser for the EU Delegation to the Council of Europe (personal capacity)

The UN and the Eighth Amendment

One thought on “The UN and the Eighth Amendment

  1. Martin says:

    Hi Guys
    just a small question. guy walks out of a open jail and is at large for 20 years. Have he been self rehabilitated and is no longer needed to finish his sentence. most countries in the EU adopt a 10 year spent policy.

    Thanks
    Martin

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *