Participation Call: Challenging Injustice in Ireland: Learning from the Past, Lessons for the Future

UCD School of Law2015 marks the 25th anniversary of Equality Studies and Women’s Studies in UCD and the 10th anniversary of the UCD School of Social Justice. Leading up to the celebration of these milestones, graduate students of the School invite you to a conference to highlight social justice, equality studies and women’s studies as fields of scholarship and to identify from current research how we can address injustices in everyday life in Ireland.

The School of Social Justice was formed in 2005 bringing together the Equality Studies Centre and the Women’s Studies Centre to promote social justice both locally and globally, using interdisciplinary, feminist and egalitarian approaches to teaching, learning and research.

Details and Call for Abstracts

When: 4th October 2014

Where: FitzGerald Chamber, Student Centre, UCD, Belfield Dublin 4.

The theme of this conference is Challenging Injustice in Ireland: Learning from the Past, Lessons for the Future

We welcome contributions from students and graduates from third-level institutions across Ireland, activists and practitioners in NGOs, Community Groups, and Partner Organisations working for equality and social justice. There will be an opportunity to present your research, participate in workshops, and attend an exhibition showcasing the work of of the school. Opening and closing lectures will be delivered by academics and activists.

There are four options for participation: Continue reading “Participation Call: Challenging Injustice in Ireland: Learning from the Past, Lessons for the Future”

Participation Call: Challenging Injustice in Ireland: Learning from the Past, Lessons for the Future

World Day of Social Justice and Ireland

Today marks the UN World Day of Social Justice. A society built on social justice is a society that not only values equality and diversity, but also puts economic and social frameworks in place for the achievement of social justice for all, regardless of race, creed, disability, sexuality, gender, political opinion, gender identity ethnicity, class and the myriad of other ways that we as human beings view and distinguish each other. Social justice is closely linked with economic justice, and as Ban Ki -moon has stated in his message for World Day of Social Justice,

Growing inequality undermines the international community’s progress in lifting millions out of poverty and building a more just world. The fault lines are visible in falling wages for women and young people and limited access to education, health services and decent jobs.

This week in Ireland we were reminded how socially unjust past actions, such as slavery, confinement and discrimination on the basis of class and gender can blight individuals full potential in later life. An Taoiseach, Enda Kenny gave a heartfelt apology to the Magdalene women. The Magdalene women fought to be heard for many decades of the plight they faced at the hands of religious institutions, directly and indirectly, assisted by the people of Ireland (see, here, here, here, here, here, here, here, herehere and here for simply a sampling on the issues regarding Magdalene Laundries that have previously been discussed on this blog).

From past (and continuing) wrongs to present social justice concerns, the recession Continue reading “World Day of Social Justice and Ireland”

World Day of Social Justice and Ireland

Thoughts on a New Ireland: Oral History and the Magdalene Laundries.

As part of the blognival ‘Thoughts on a New Ireland’, HRinI is pleased to publish this post by Katherine O’Donnell, Director of Women’s Studies, (UCD School of Social Justice) and member of the Advisory Committee of Justice for Magdalenes.

Justice for Magdalenes (JFM) www.magdalenelaundries.com has been focused on providing evidence of the Irish State’s collusion in the punitive, recarceal, for-profit-enterprises known as the Magdalene Laundries which were operated at ten locations by four Catholic religious orders – the last one closed in 1996. JFM has been circulating a draft ‘restorative justice and redress scheme’ for the women and girls who were incarcerated in the Magdalene Laundry system.

We propose that, following an apology by the State, a dedicated unit within the Department of Justice is established with the remit of facilitating surviving women and their families to access all state social services to which they are entitled and to operating as an ‘inter-departmental’ hub in further facilitating other State services and expertise. We are currently working on the detail of a compensation scheme, for lost wages, pension contributions and personal damage, the funding of which is envisaged will be provided by the Religious Congregations. In coming to terms with the complexities we have become avid students of  the wide variety of truth commissions and redress schemes which everywhere have to navigate the  gap between best Human Rights practice such as that enshrined in the 2005 UN Basic Principles and Guidelines on the Right to a Remedy and Reparation for Victims of Gross Violations of International Human Rights Law etc. and  individuals’ rights to privacy, family life and a good name.

Continue reading “Thoughts on a New Ireland: Oral History and the Magdalene Laundries.”

Thoughts on a New Ireland: Oral History and the Magdalene Laundries.

Conference: Equality in a Time of Crisis

This Thursday and Friday the Egalitarian World Initiative based in the UCD School of Social Justice will host a major conference entitled ‘Equality in a Time of Crisis’. The conference features keynote speeches from four celebrated theorists: Sylvia Walby, Richard Wilkinson, Martha Fineman and Andrew Sayer. It will also feature panels with speakers such as Vincent Browne, Michael D Higgins and Sara Burke. Full details including registration information are available here.

Conference: Equality in a Time of Crisis