Book Launch 11 December 2014: Ireland and the ECHR 60 Years and Beyond

Irl & ECHROn December 11 2014, the new edited collection Ireland and the European Convention on Human Rights: 60 Years and Beyond (Bloomsbury, 2014) will be launched by The Hon. Ms. Justice Ann Power-Forde in UCD School of Law.

Date: 11 December 2014

Time: 6.30 p.m.

Location: The Atrium, UCD Sutherland School of Law, Belfield, Dublin 4

RSVP: Please RSVP to Sinead Hennessy, email: sinead.hennessy@ucd.ie or telephone: 01 716 4105.

 

About Judge Power-Forde

Judge Power-Forde served as the Irish judge on the European Court of Human Rights from 2008 until October 2014. Judge Power-Forde was appointed a Senior Counsel in 2006 . Prior to Judge Power-Forde’s elevation to the ECtHR, she practised extensively in constitutional and public law, child law and medical law. Judge Power-Forde has also lectured extensively in a variety of education institutions in law and philosophy.

About  Ireland and the European Convention on Human Rights: 60 Years and Beyond

This edited collection provides expert analysis on a wide variety of areas, including: the operation and impact of the ECHR and ECHR Act 2003 in Ireland, the growing impact of the European Union Charter of Fundamental Rights and its relationship with the ECHR law in Ireland, the role of the ECHR in the private sphere, direct provision and the ECHR, immigration, gender recognition, socio-economic rights and public interest law and issues relating to access to justice. The preface and full table of contents for this edited collection, can be accessed here: Preface & Table of Contents Ireland and the ECHR 60 Years and Beyond (with thanks to Bloomsbury for permission for this).

Bloomsbury are offering Human Rights in Ireland readers a 20% discount on the purchase price of this collection. You can order a copy here and you should use the discount code: ECHR20% when promoted to enter the discount code in the payment field.

Book Launch 11 December 2014: Ireland and the ECHR 60 Years and Beyond

UCD Event: Mr Justice Albie Sachs on Justice, Memory & Art

Albie SachsOn Thursday 27th March 2014 from 5.30-7.15 p.m. , UCD School of Law hosts the John M. Kelly Memorial Lecture. This year, the John M. Kelly Memorial Lecture is to be delivered by Mr Justice Albie Sachs. Mr Justice Sachs will speak on Justice, Memory and Art.  Mr Justice Sachs is a human rights activist and a lawyer, deeply involved in struggles for ridding South Africa of racial apartheid. A member of the South African Constitutional Court from 1994-2009, Mr Justice Sachs was involved in key cases that shaped (and continue to shape) the rights of people in South Africa.

Registration for this event is free, however registration is essential given the likely strong demand to hear from Mr. Justice Sachs.  You can register for this event here.

On Friday, March 28th, the Public Interest Law Alliance (PILA) will be hosting a conference, Using the Law to Challenge Injustice. Mr Justice Albie Sachs will be the keynote speaker at this conference.  You can find more information and registration on the PILA event here.

UCD Event: Mr Justice Albie Sachs on Justice, Memory & Art

Event: Justice Chris Maxwell to Speak at UCD

SC VictoriaUCD Human Rights Network will host a seminar to be delivered by The Hon. Mr Justice Chris Maxwell, President of the  Court of Appeal Division of the Supreme Court of Victoria (Australia) on Friday 27 September 2013 at 9am.

President Maxwell will speak on “The Victorian Charter of Human Rights & Responsibilities

Event Date & Time: 9.00 am, Friday 27 September 2013.

Location: University College Dublin, School of Law Boardroom, Roebuck Castle.

All welcome.

Event: Justice Chris Maxwell to Speak at UCD

State Execution: From Roger Casement to the 21st Century

Roger CasementOn Monday, 13th May 2013, UCD School of Law will host a free event: State Execution: From Roger Casement to the 21st Century from 7pm to 9pm in UCD Newman House, St. Stephen’s Green, Dublin 2. The keynote speaker for this event is The Hon. Mr. Justice Bernard McCloskey , a judge of the Northern Irish High Court in Belfast. UCD Judge in Residence ,  The Hon. Roderick Murphy who served as a Judge of the High Court until his retirement in April 2013, will chair this event. The abstract for this fascinating talk is as follows:

The scope of this presentation and the reflections which it contains take as their starting point the offence of high treason under the Treason Act 1351, which was punishable by death. The immediate impetus for this presentation is the impending centenary of the execution of one of the outstanding figures in Irish history, Roger Casement.  State succinctly, his common law right to life, the supreme right in the civilised world, was extinguished by a duly made Parliamentary law which was the subject of judicial interpretation and an ensuing judicial decision which admitted of no discretion.

Within the scope of this presentation are the topics of Roger Casement the man; his treason, trial, conviction and ensuing appeal; the hanging; the evolution of the death penalty and the right to life during the 20th century; the impact of the ECHR and the Human Rights Act; the landmark decision of the South African Constitutional Court; the peculiarities of the US Constitution; and some of the UN right to life protection instruments.

Full biographies of the speaker and chair, along with booking information for this event are available here.

State Execution: From Roger Casement to the 21st Century

World Day of Social Justice and Ireland

Today marks the UN World Day of Social Justice. A society built on social justice is a society that not only values equality and diversity, but also puts economic and social frameworks in place for the achievement of social justice for all, regardless of race, creed, disability, sexuality, gender, political opinion, gender identity ethnicity, class and the myriad of other ways that we as human beings view and distinguish each other. Social justice is closely linked with economic justice, and as Ban Ki -moon has stated in his message for World Day of Social Justice,

Growing inequality undermines the international community’s progress in lifting millions out of poverty and building a more just world. The fault lines are visible in falling wages for women and young people and limited access to education, health services and decent jobs.

This week in Ireland we were reminded how socially unjust past actions, such as slavery, confinement and discrimination on the basis of class and gender can blight individuals full potential in later life. An Taoiseach, Enda Kenny gave a heartfelt apology to the Magdalene women. The Magdalene women fought to be heard for many decades of the plight they faced at the hands of religious institutions, directly and indirectly, assisted by the people of Ireland (see, here, here, here, here, here, here, here, herehere and here for simply a sampling on the issues regarding Magdalene Laundries that have previously been discussed on this blog).

From past (and continuing) wrongs to present social justice concerns, the recession Continue reading “World Day of Social Justice and Ireland”

World Day of Social Justice and Ireland

The Future of the ECHR: Events at UCD School of Law

Next weekend the School of Law in UCD will hold two related events reflecting on the future of the European Court and European Convention on Human Rights. The first is a seminar by Deputy Registrar of the Court, and respected scholar on the Court and Convention, Michael O’Boyle. This seminar will take place at 6pm, Friday April 1st 2011 in the Humanities Institute in UCD. The title of the seminar is “The Future of the European Court of Human Rights”.  In his paper, Deputy Registrar O’Boyle will thus address the issue of institutional reform of the Court which has been confronting a case load crisis of massive proportions for years, raising questions about  its continued viability. The seminar is organised by the Human Rights Network and celebrates the launch, this year, of our LL.M in Human Rights about which you can find more information here. The seminar is open to all, but please do RSVP sinead.hennessy@ucd.ie

Then on Saturday April 2nd the PhD community at the School of Law will host a conference on the future of the Court and the Convention with speakers from Europe and North America. The full conference programme is posted here, but highlights include opening remarks from Justice John Hedigan, now of the Irish High Court and previously of the European Court of Human Rights. The conference takes the form of a workshop, with discussants for each session as well as general discussion on the papers. Papers from the workshop will be published as a special issue of the A-ranked German Law Journal, which will be guest edited by the two organising PhD candidates Kanstantsin Dzehtsiarou and Alan Greene. Again, all are welcome to attend the workshop.

The Future of the ECHR: Events at UCD School of Law

Housing Law: Recent Developments

On 17 November, the UCD Constitutional Studies Group, supported by the UCD School of Law, will host a conference on recent developments in housing law. This will take place between 5.30 and 7.45 in the Belvedere Hotel, Great Denmark St, Dublin 1 with papers from Neil Maddox, Angela Ward and Fiona de Londras. The conference will consider recent developments in housing law with a particular focus on the implications for Irish housing law of the ECHR Act 2003. The recent judgments in Kay v United Kingdom (ECHR, 21 September 2010) and Manchester City Council v Pinnock (UK Supreme Court, 3 November 2010), and the implications which they have for Irish housing authorities under the ECHR Act 2003 will be discussed in detail. The speakers will also address recent developments in negligence and nuisance. This event will be of interest to legal practitioners, local authorities, and organisations who deal with housing issues. More complete details are available here

2 CPD hours are available for this conference. The fee is €40 (for practitioners of five years or more experience, academics and local authority representatives) or €25 (for practitioners of less than five years experience, students, NGO representatives, and the unwaged).  To reserve a place people should contact sinead.hennessy[at]ucd.ie

Housing Law: Recent Developments

Quotes from Women on Law and Justice

Here at UCD School of Law we are moving towards completing our fantastic new building for the Sutherland School of Law (take a tour here), under the academic directorship of Professor Imelda Maher (left). One of the features of the School will be a corridor of quotations about law and justice coming, not only from lawyers, but from people of all walks of life: politicians, activists, novelists, poets etc… As we finalise these quotes, I was wondering whether you–lovely readers–had suggestions for quotes from women on the themes of law and justice. My personal favourite, so far, is from Mary Robinson who said “In a society where the rights and potential of women are constrained, no man can be truly free. He may have power, but he will not have freedom”.

What are your favourite quotes from women about law and justice?

Quotes from Women on Law and Justice

Lord Kerr on the Relationship between ECtHR and Domestic Courts

As we noted here, Friday evening saw UCD School of Law host the 13th Memorial John M Kelly Lecture, this year delivered by Lord Kerr; justice of the UK Supreme Court. The lecture, entitled “The Conversation between the European Court of Human Rights and National Courts: Dialogue or Dictation” was a wide ranging and extremely interesting one and the audience ranged from sitting and retired justices of the Supreme and High Court to undergraduate students in the School.

Lord Kerr was primarily concerned with the implications for courts in Ireland and the UK (although, primarily the UK), of Europen Court of Human Rights decisions that appeared to lay down a universal rule for the member states of the Council of Europe but where implementation of that rule caused substantial practical difficulties in the domestic state. The focus on Ireland and the UK had two bases: firstly these two jurisdictions are the only common law jurisdictions in the Council of Europe; secondly, s. 2 of the Human Rights Act 1998 and s. 4 of the ECHR Act 2003 require the courts, respectively, to take ECtHR jurisprudence “into account” (HRA 1998) or to take “judicial notice” and “due account” thereof (ECHR Act 2003).

Lord Kerr identified a number of reasons why any conception of Convention caselaw as ‘binding’ (if that was how these statutory provisions were interpreted) might be problematic. 1: Where there is a written constitution there may be tensions between constitutional supremacy and Convention caselaw. 2: Because of the ECtHR’s commitment to dynamic/evolutive interpretation of the Convention there is strict concept of precedent in the Strasbourg court, which may make things like the contemporaneousness of a judgment important in considering whether it ought to be binding or not; 3: Where a domestic court considers itself bound to follow a Strasbourg decision serious practical difficulties may flow from the implementation of that decision. Continue reading “Lord Kerr on the Relationship between ECtHR and Domestic Courts”

Lord Kerr on the Relationship between ECtHR and Domestic Courts

Brendan O'Leary to Speak at UCD School of Law

olearyProf. Brendan O’Leary, Lauder Professor of Political Science in University of Pennsylvania, will speak at the UCD School of Law on “Departing Responsibly from Iraq” this Thursday evening. The lecture will take place at 5pm in the UCD Legal Education Centre in UCD (Fosters Avenue Entrance) and is not to be missed by anyone interested in the aftermath of the Iraq War.

Brendan O’Leary, born in Cork, is Lauder Professor of Political Science at the University of Pennsylvania, and currently on secondment as the Expert on Power-Sharing attached to the Mediation Support Unit of the United Nations. He was schooled in county Antrim,  and is a graduate of Oxford and the London School of Economics, where he subsequently was a professor and chair of its Government Department.  He is the author, co-author, or co-editor of nineteen books, most recently How to Get Out of Iraq With Integrity, Terror Insurgency and the State, The Future of Kurdistan in Iraq, and The Northern Ireland Conflict: Consociational Engagements. O’Leary was a policy advisor to the British Labour Party on Northern Ireland between 1988 and 1996, and subsequently advised Irish, British and American officials and parties before during and after the Good Friday Agreement. His book with John McGarry on Policing Northern Ireland: Proposals for a New Start was extensively cited by the Patten Commission. Between 2003 and 2009 he was regularly a constitutional advisor to the Kurdistan Regional Government in Iraq. He has also been a constitutional consultant for in Somalia, South Africa, and Nepal. His next book, co-edited with Joanne McEvoy, will be on Power Sharing in Deeply Divided Places.

Anyone interested in attending should pre-register their interest with Gina Molloy at gina.molloy[at]ucd.ie

Brendan O'Leary to Speak at UCD School of Law