UN Special Rapporteur on Corrib Gas Protests

We are delighted to welcome this cross-post by Dr Shane Darcy from the Business and Human Rights in Ireland Blog.  The Business and Human Rights in Ireland Blog is dedicated to tracking and analysing developments relating to business and human rights in Ireland. It aims to address legal and policy issues, as well as highlighting human rights concerns raised by the activities of Irish companies or multinational corporations based in Ireland. The blog is run by Dr Shane Darcy who is a lecturer at the Irish Centre for Human Rights, National University of Ireland Galway.

The United Nations Special Rapporteur on the situation of Human Rights Defenders has raised concerns regarding the treatment of those opposing the onshore gas pipeline being built by Shell and Statoil in Erris, Co. Mayo. Margaret Sekaggya outlines her views in a report submitted this week to the United Nations Human Rights Council. The Special Rapporteur finds that there is credible evidence which indicates:

the existence of a pattern of intimidation, harassment, surveillance and criminalization of those peacefully opposing the Corrib Gas project.

The policing of protests seems to have been disproportionate in some instances, she reports, while “there have also been serious concerns about the lawfulness of certain actions by the private security firm employed by Shell”.

The Corrib Gas dispute has Continue reading “UN Special Rapporteur on Corrib Gas Protests”

UN Special Rapporteur on Corrib Gas Protests

Towards Affirmative Action in Irish Education

Amid accusations of educational apartheid in the admissions policies of Irish schools, a landmark Circuit Court ruling in Clonmel allowed an appeal by a secondary school against an Equality Authority ruling that it had indirectly discriminated against a Traveller boy in refusing to admit him. The admissions policy of the Christian Brothers High School in Clonmel is a familiar one in the Irish educational landscape: that the applicant be Catholic; that he would have attended a recognised feeder primary school; and that he would have had a father or brother who attended the school prior to him. Continue reading “Towards Affirmative Action in Irish Education”

Towards Affirmative Action in Irish Education

Irish Times Journalist wins Award for work on Discrimination Facing Persons with Disabilities

The Irish Times journalist Carl O’Brien is the Irish winner of the Together Against Discrimination award for a series of articles he has written on issues relating to persons with disabilities.  The prize is part of the European Commission’s anti-discrimination policy awarded to journalists (print and online) that make a contribution to a better public understanding of diversity and discrimination.  The series of articles that Carl wrote earlier this year highlighted instances of abuse perpetrated against persons with disabilities in residential settings.  He also pointed up the appalling conditions experienced by people living in out-dated institutions.  Carl’s work has been the source of discussion in blogs on humanrights.ie.  See here and here.  His work on exposing large-scale complaints regarding abuse and mistreatment of disabled persons in residential settings, in particular, facilitated an important awareness of the need to introduce mandatory standards and independent inspections for assessing care provided by residential services.  Media professionals and anti-discrimination experts judge the national award winner in each EU Member State.  Carl’s work will now go forward to an EU jury who will select an overall winner.

Irish Times Journalist wins Award for work on Discrimination Facing Persons with Disabilities