Race & Ethnicity

#DirectProvision15: Making Visible

#DirectProvision15: Making Visible

This guest post coincides with today’s moments of silence outside the Department of Justice, making 15 years of direct provision in Ireland. Events are also taking place in Galway and Limerick. Making Visible – Ceara Conway, Noirin Ni Rian and Veronika Ncube St Nicholas’s Cathedral, Galway,Ireland 6th January, 2014 One of a series of socially(…)

#DirectProvision15: UNKNOWN

#DirectProvision15: UNKNOWN

This poem comes from Bibly Mosa UNKNOWN I have arrive and concluded the story But am nervous to roll the scroll. I will like to say is all over but we just began, Loved to end it all but my mind is not at rest. Emotions are dip but saturated with the love of continuity. How(…)

#DirectProvision15: The need for an independent complaints mechanism

#DirectProvision15: The need for an independent complaints mechanism

Jennifer DeWan is Campaigns and Communications Manager in Nasc, the Irish Immigrant Support Centre. Nasc, the Irish Immigrant Support Centre has long campaigned for the introduction of an independent complaints mechanism to provide oversight of the direct provision system. The current complaints system – outlined in the Reception and Integration Agency’s (RIA) House Rules and Procedures –(…)

#DirectProvision15: 15 years of the system of Direct Provision in Ireland

#DirectProvision15: 15 years of the system of Direct Provision in Ireland

Human Rights in Ireland have been running a week long online event since Monday to mark the 15th year of Direct Provision in Ireland. Throughout the week, there have been new and retrospective contributions from a cross section of civil society, NGOs, supporters and legal professionals highlighting the issue of Direct Provision: 15 years of reports,(…)

#DirectProvision15: Direct Provision A Protest Poem

#DirectProvision15: Direct Provision A Protest Poem

Here’s a poem I wrote for Comhlamh fifteen years ago, on the introduction of Direct Provision. They launched a booklet and asked me to say a few words. I read the booklet, was horrified, and wrote this poem.  It’s with a sense of shame that I submit it, fifteen years later, with Direct Provision, supposedly(…)

#DirectProvision15: Mathematical Dilemma about Direct Provision

#DirectProvision15: Mathematical Dilemma about Direct Provision

This post comes from Stephen Ng’ang’a 15 years ago a system was signed off by some civil servants. This system now called direct provision was meant to accommodate those seeking asylum for a period of 6 months. Today the system prides itself for having been in place for 15 years. It has continued to exist with(…)

#DirectProvision15: Asylum Seekers and the Right to Work

#DirectProvision15: Asylum Seekers and the Right to Work

This video is from a group of Occupational Therapy students. Kerrie McGroarty writes: “As part of our college work myself and a group of other students created a video looking at the impact not being allowed to work has on asylum seekers.”

#DirectProvision15: FIGHTBACK!

#DirectProvision15: FIGHTBACK!

These series of imagines, from Rory O’Neill, show the role of asylum seekers and their supporters in fighting back and calling for an end of direct provision. You can view all photos from this protest, on 20 November 2014, Universal Children’s Day, here.      

#DirectProvision15: Preforming Precarity and Asylum Seekers Struggle Against Direct Provision

Jordana Starkman is currently a student at Concordia University in Montreal. Jordana recently wrote and presented a paper for a conference run through the school of Canadian Irish Studies at Concordia on direct provision and the bravery and strength of the protests against it. For ease of reading, you can also access the full paper here: Performing Precarity .(…)

#DirectProvision15: €19.10 and Other Stories

#DirectProvision15: €19.10 and Other Stories

Rory O’Neill is an artist. These images are taken from Rory’s work €19.10 & OTHER STORIES. Today is the 15th anniversary of the system of direct provision.  #1               #2               #3               #4      (…)

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