Liam Thornton

About Liam Thornton

http://www.ucd.ie/law/staff/faculty/liamthornton/

Liam Thornton is a lecturer in law and director of clinical legal education in University College Dublin. His particular research interests are on issues relating to the welfare state, human rights, socio-economic rights, Governmentality, immigration law and EU law. You can contact him at liam.thornton[at]ucd.ie or (+353) 1 716 4129.

Posts by Liam Thornton:

Why Budget 2015 must be that last of its kind

Why Budget 2015 must be that last of its kind

Human Rights in Ireland welcomes this guest post from Yvonne O’Sullivan of the Free Legal Advice Centres (FLAC). Yvonne is Advocacy and Policy Officer in FLAC. Speculation on budget measures had circulated in media outlets in the final days before Budget 2015. Reports before the budget abounded that the architect group, the Economic Management Council(…)

NASC: Invitation to Tender for Immigration Research

NASC: Invitation to Tender for Immigration Research

Nasc, the Irish Immigrant Support Centre is commissioning independent research to analyse immigration related detention in Ireland and the treatment of detainees for immigration related offences, including those who are detained following a refusal of permission to land. This project is funded by the St Stephen’s Green Trust. Details of this tender, including aims and(…)

“Let us Play”: Support Children in Direct Provision

“Let us Play”: Support Children in Direct Provision

The Children’s Rights Alliance are currently fundraising to fund football equipment, club registration fees and football gear for kids in the direct provision system. You can make a donation to this fundraising event here. The system of direct provision has been under sustained media and public scrutiny since Carl O’Brien’s  excellent Irish Times series, Lives in(…)

Direct Provision: The Beginning of the End?

Direct Provision: The Beginning of the End?

Over the last number of weeks, there have been potentially significant developments in relation to the system of direct provision for asylum seekers in Ireland. Last week, the High Court case challenging the system of direct provision concluded. A decision is expected over the next number of weeks (see here for background). Speaking on 24(…)

The Rights of Others: Asylum Seekers and Direct Provision in Ireland

The Rights of Others: Asylum Seekers and Direct Provision in Ireland

On 24 June 2014, I spoke at a seminar The Ethic’s of ‘Home': Direct Provision, Homelessness and Ireland’s Housing Policies.  This seminar, organised by Dr Ronni Greenwood, sought to explore conceptions and meanings of home, in the context of housing and homelessness. My paper, The Rights of Others: Asylum Seekers and Direct Provision in Ireland sought to(…)

The Myth of the Cherished Child in Ireland

The Myth of the Cherished Child in Ireland

The last number of weeks have seen much hand wringing and pretense of ‘not knowing’ from government, politicians and the public at large to the treatment of mothers and children for many decades in Ireland (see here, here, here and here). The penal institutions of borstals, industrial schools, ‘unmarried mother’ country homes, homes for first unmarried(…)

Conference: Beyond the Single Procedure: Reforming Ireland’s Protection System

Conference: Beyond the Single Procedure: Reforming Ireland’s Protection System

Nasc, the Irish Immigrant Support Centre and  UCD’s Sutherland School of Law invite you to a one day conference to mark World Refugee Day on the 20th June 2014 in UCD’s William Fry Theatre from 10 am – 3pm. The conference, titled Beyond the Single Procedure: Reforming Ireland’s Protection System. This conference is an opportunity to bring together(…)

New Publication: #DirectProvision14 No Place to Call Home

New Publication: #DirectProvision14 No Place to Call Home

Following on from Human Rights in Ireland’s marking of 14 Years of Direct Provision in Ireland (see all posts here), along with Caroline Reid from the Irish Refugee Council, a publication marking this event has now been produced. Once again, my thanks to all those who contributed blog posts, in particular asylum seekers who spoke(…)

Back to top